Courses

 

The Drawing Concentration allows students to create their own pathway across identified courses throughout the College. Each year, a course listing is generated of all recognized Drawing Concentration eligible courses and published on the Drawing Concentration website. This provides a guide for students as they register. Students can request that the Drawing Concentration Coordinator recognizes courses that are not included in this listing. This could occur due to late announcements, new courses, or if students take relevant courses at Brown University.
(courses will be added each semester)

In addition to the courses offered by the Concentration listed below, see the list of pre-approved courses offered across campus here.

Drawing Concentration-Sponsored Courses, 2019-20 Academic Year

HAVC: History of Drawing 
(offered Fall 2019 by Susanne Scanlan)

As a stimulus to the imagination, method of investigation, or as a basic means of communication, drawing is a fundamental process of human thought. This class will examine various kinds of drawings from the history of art and visual culture moving chronologically from the medieval to the post-modern. Our studies will have a hands-on approach, meeting behind the scenes in the collections of the RISD Museum. Working from objects directly will be supplemented by readings and writing assignments as well as active classroom discussion.

DRAW: The Artist in the City: Drawing In Providence
(offered Fall 2019 by Deborah Zlotsky)

The Artist in the City: Drawing in Providence focuses on exploring ways to observe, document and respond to the city of Providence. Students will first gain a variety of perceptual and experimental drawing experiences during the initial 6 weeks of the semester. Class time is devoted to critique on outside projects followed by observational on-site drawing sessions in various locations around the city. During this time, students will develop 1-2 week-long outside projects, responding to specific assignments to experience Providence as a viewer, a flâneur, a collector, a sociologist, and a cartographer. These on-site and more conceptually-driven experiences will help students begin to examine layers of spatial, personal, collective, cultural, historical, and ecological elements and the peculiarities of their relationship to the space and history of the Providence. Students will learn how to create a distinctive voice, culminating in a substantial and focused project that chronicles an important aspect of their relationship to the city. These projects will be shaped by a visual, material, and intellectual discovery process centered around issues of visibility, movement, space, connection, and history. 

DRAW: Independent Drawing Project
(offered Wintersession 2020 by Masha Ryskin)

The goal of Independent Drawing Project is for students to develop a distinct, carefully conceived, and self-directed body of works through a process of investigation, critical assessment and production. Through a rigorous studio practice, students are expected to identify and develop their own conceptual interests and material approaches.  Individual and group critiques support, facilitate, and intensify this process. While drawing concentrators will be given priority, interested students outside of the concentration and beyond the sophomore level may take this course. For the drawing concentrator, the work created for the Independent Drawing Project serves as the culmination of the Drawing Concentration program. Critiques will run from 6-9 pm, followed by independent studio work.

Open to juniors, seniors and 5th-year students

Graduate students by permission of instructor

Fiber, Paper, Drawing
(offered Wintersession 2020 by Masha Ryskin)

In this course, students will examine the relationship between paper and drawing and will have the opportunity to make hand-made paper to use in their drawing and mixed media work. The papermaking possibilities will range from traditional editioned sheets to cast and constructed paper that will then be incorporated into students’ drawings. Lectures on the history of papermaking as well as examples of the rich potential of papermaking in contemporary art will be integral to the course. The first two weeks will be spent making and learning about paper while developing ideas for a longer-term project. Beginning the third week, students will explore paper in conjunction with drawing and surface manipulation. The final projects can be pursued individually or in small groups, and can take multiple forms, ranging from traditional drawings to large-scale artist books and installations.

DRAW 1509-01: Drawing Marathon 
(Offered Wintersession 2020 by Gwen Strahle )

Intensive, perceptual drawing class meets from 9am to 9pm, Monday-Friday during the first two weeks of Wintersession and on Schedule B thereafter. A rigorous investigation of drawing from the model and/or large set-up sprawling across classroom. Deeper contact to the drawing experience through sustained exposure. Opportunity for re-invention, change. Confront problems of drawing, build on strengths. Emphasis on drawing consolidation, concentration, stamina, persistence. Regular critiques, slide talks, RISD museum trips. The goals of this course are to facilitate and maintain a continuous flow of drawing energy and examination. Students will re-examine the way they make drawings, in a progressive drawing environment. Through sustained contact with their drawing(s), students will make personal advancement.

DRAW 1112: Materials of Drawing
(Offered Spring 2020 by Andrew Raftery )

Over thousands of years, the materials and methods of drawing have evolved in response to the needs of artists and designers. Technical manuals, patents and other texts record specific drawing techniques. Research into these sources will lead to making actual drawing materials – inks, quill pens, grounds for metal point, chalks, etc. – which will be tested through a range of personal drawing projects and copies of historical works. Trials of newly available drawing materials will yield information about potential uses and permanency. Best practices for care and display of drawings will be covered throughout the course.

HAVC: History of Drawing 
(offered Spring 2020 by Mary Bergstein)

As a stimulus to the imagination, method of investigation, or as a basic means of communication, drawing is a fundamental process of human thought. This class will examine various kinds of drawings from the history of art and visual culture moving chronologically from the medieval to the post-modern. Our studies will have a hands-on approach, meeting behind the scenes in the collections of the RISD Museum. Working from objects directly will be supplemented by readings and writing assignments as well as active classroom discussion.